About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
CSPAN2 29
LANGUAGE
English 29
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
these. they start out kind of begging them and then they get really angry that would bring them down on you and the girl was down on you the confederacy really has a starvation level of food crisis and when that happens they know it's coming. governors and county clerks are writing each other and writing the secretary of war saying you can't take any more food out of the counties for the army. these people are starving. of the women stepped in at the moment to represent communities and they start really attacking the confederate government about the justice of the military policies. the rich man's war and the poor man's fight becomes as well the men are not home, the women step up and they start to rewrite power on the home front into their hands and the notes themselves as powerful constituencies of the state and county officials have to take account of and in the spring of 1863 there is a wave of riots the stores in atlanta and its more than a dozen sweeps the confederacy all by women from like a dozen in richmond to 300 followed by the crowd of a thousand other people, and this is
life doing press and begging, and they're called politician. and once in a while a publicker servant, we get one who also has the capacity to be a public servant and has a little time left over at the end of the day between lying and begging to take care of the country. [laughter] and as milton friedman said, we just don't have the time to bone up on the people who are trying to rob us through the x corporation, the people who are trying to rob us through the y union and the people who are getting a subsidy for this and that because we think about it for ten seconds a year, and they think about it all day every day. so there's only one thing that we can do, and that's to cut taxes and slash the size of the government. [applause] because, you know, who knows, who knows if there are confidence men. i don't know. you know, i met mitt romney. i like him very much. i shook his hand. on the other hand, i actually grew up and was born on the south side of chicago where obama claims to come from and was born in hyde park, and i saw that whole substratum -- i see everything through -- of cour
soldiers begged him not to go, he told them to support general burnside as they had supported him and off he went. a great moment that vindicated his patriotism in a difficult year. but the other thing to remember and i alluded to it in the speech was bad in april 1861, when the confederates fired on work sumpter, there was not a single man in the north who had ever led more than 1000 troops in battle. and the men who had led that anywhere in their 60's. the war was being commanded by, in the best case, captains in the regular army who had experience commanding one or 200 men and in the worst case, politicians who had never led a single person in battle. so the fact that lincoln had a hard time finding the generals who could lease -- lead these vast armies of 100,000 men are more shouldn't surprise us. .. and every day he heard from people urging him to do nothing about slavery, that the issue is not slavery. his southern border of the union was comprised of four slaveowning states, missouri, kentucky, maryland and delaware. he was in constant fear of any move that would cause them to sim
for a stronger ally of the united states in the region, i will agree with you. but i beg to differ because the cheapest aircraft today at the united states in the middle east is in that region. we are in the frontline presenting the same value in same principles. you'll find the source is coming to shores. >> thank you. >> you know, i share your concerns about iran. i worry about it all the time. i think it's real. but growing up jewish, and learned that being jewish also meant caring about the stranger from the bible or the people of king david, but also people of the profits. what i didn't hear in your talk is forgive me, but any kind of humanity towards palestinians. i don't know what you paid to do with them. i don't think he thought about, no offense ap said the solution. does that mean turn gets the west bank. but i know if israel keeps territories commit either stop in a democracy or a jewish state. i know there's problems with houston has come a serious ones. i believe arafat could've made a deal at oslo and there could've been peace. i am not naÏve. but i think the constant build
. then two weeks later, three weeks later, kennedy himself is assassinated. and as you said before, this begs the question that historians argue about. we will probably keep arguing about that the next 50 years. what kennedy has mounted to -- what he have pulled out of the american troops in vietnam and the advisers if we didn't yet have the troops and the great numbers of the combat troops there? and you are doing think that indications are that he would have come in and you cite various sources about that. curious just to challenge that a little bit. there is a wonderful book by a story called choosing war which you probably know. in which he says that the viet cong attacks were doubling in november from the month before and south vietnam and that there were meetings of kennedy's tauter advisers which i think finished up the day before kennedy was assassinated. this would be a good film. and incidentally the viet cong we are going to win if they didn't do something very quickly. so, not to challenge the members of people who were devolve in the sand kennedy would have pulled out, but wouldn
prestige box. it is buy 1 get 1 free, bogo! we have never done this before but i have been begging my buyers to do3 and i honestly did not think it would happen but it is happening! 2 boxes! we have the beautiful suede finish and a burgundy wine color and the camel. you get two of they are different and fabulous and amazing. pick your favorite color this is brand new u.s. the first audience to see id.it is scheduled tonight but i did not think it will be there so you should get yours now item213-857. i am so excited! we have a lot of fun things coming. we would love to hear from you 1-866-376-8255 >>host: also definitely join us in the live chat we have someone there that will be saying hello to you. we love girls and the live chat. nload that application for free bite diallingtar star hsn.you can also join me on facebook page i am colleen lopez on hsn. i hope you are in the mood for shopping because we have special things in store for you. including the biggest and best value ever on the herkimer quartz is our beautiful earring today's special, hit it comes [♪ music ♪] >>host:
with debt and entitlement and get torch the knees begging government to save them. every step of the way. watch it that's what barack obama has done. he pulled the professor in front of the nation and no one stopped him. i have been saying it every step of the way. >> wayne allyn root is a libertarian different than a conservative? >> yeah. it's a little more moderate and tolerant on social issues which are almost meaningfulless. what difference does it make if you have gay marriage if you are gay and unemployed. what difference does it make if you have an abortion and you are employed. the answer is what matters is jobs. jobs and the economy. and so, you know, i think from every measure standard obama's a failure. back to libertarian. republicans had the chance with george bush. he was a failure. terrible president. the only guy worse than bush is barm. back to back you've had two terrible presidents. the difference is one supported capitalism one without any questions is socialist. the socialist is obama. libertarians on the other hand haven't caused any of the problem. we haven't been
with these ideas. so ladies and gentlemen, i beg you to join me in welcoming to the library, speaker newt gingrich. [applause] [applause] [applause] >> thank you all very, very much. it's always an honor to be back at the reagan library. i want to thank john hi bush did a great shot peterson at providing leadership on a day-to-day basis. the degree to which this library is a model of educating young people is really remarkable and a lot of that goes to the mag entity candidate fundraising ability. john, thank you for your work. [applause] i hope all of you will join me and keeping mrs. reagan in your prayers. she's a remarkable woman who spent a lifetime serving this country and we all cherish her as she continued to play a role at the library. i could come here and not mention nancy for at least a moment. i also want to say, governor, it's great to be back with you. we did a lot of things over the years have been mayor of san diego to u.s. senator, to governor to a leader and a variety of ways. and the tequila scrape people who represent a willingness to serve their state in an important way. it'
time because it has a certain ring of truth. it does have a certain ring of truth. it does beg the question that haunts this book, that is part of a meditation upon i am inviting you to have. where do we want a market way of seeing and where do we draw the line? where do we not want a market way of seeing? i ask the people in this book what do you think of this? some said why do we need to have our own genetic child? so many children need to be adopted who are orphans. look of the aids orphans in africa and the like and others said it is fine to went your genetic child but why couldn't there be family or friend or someone from the church who would offer, lot of women of goodwill light in your own community come forward and others said you might not want that entanglement, you want more anonymity but why not do it in a nonprofit organizations such as that is the british solution. it is legal but through non-profit. another said it is fine to the for-profit. go to l a. it is fine. for it to be a for profit thing. so long as there's some kind of a bond formed between the genetic m
, begs to question to replace with whom? he did. i think he regretted it. john eisenhower told me that after the u2 was shot down, he went to his father on the plane to the paris summit about to collapse, the paris summit, and said to him, dad, you should have fired that guy, and ike blew up and basically said i'm the president of the united states, but it was a little defensive about it because, you know, he probably should have gotten rid of dulles. they are clearer in retrospect than they are at the time. ike was a great manager, but he was arguably a little slow to get rid of people. i think not in world war ii, no problem with sacking generals in world war ii, but maybe a little slow in his own administration, at least in the second term. this is one squishy area in his presidency. i spent a lot of time on it. my long study of intelligence on the outside, amateur at it, but presidents think you can snap your fingers, and the cia does miraclous things. it doesn't work that way. eisenhower did understand that. he was reasonable about this. this is all highly relevant because ri
used to sell patricia cornwell. each unto itself. it begs the question when we put an ad in "new york times" come it's not like putting an advertisement for a honda or a cadillac. it is one book. it is not random house advertising on its books. it's one book. it's a very different and very subjective business, which means that you can only fit so much when it comes to marrying books to readers, books for which publishers pay a deal for. when i was at schuster, they paid $8 million, which had been a record number for ronald reagan's memoir, called american life. you know, the math as well as i do. you need to sell 4 million books. not just write a million dollars, you need to sell 250,000. the book actually sold about 300,000 copies. so it was a spectacular failure. because of the comparison. it's a highly complex business with a very thin margin of process. when you add to that the dramatic changes in technology and the public demand, you have an industry that needs to redefine itself. nobody knows that more than the people sitting on the stage who are here to talk to you about it. yo
represent, i don't want metro coming to our district. it will keep people out. they are begging for metro. i spent an hour and a half commuting 8.6 miles. all across the country we have a need to to get our work done and many in the freight rail industry, we would be more efficient if we ridge sharing tracks and infrastructure with passenger rail system so let's get this right, send the money we need to spend and let's consider that an investment and the payoff may be not for us but a couple generations and with that i yield. >> gentleman from indiana. >> i will make a few comments. i am from indiana and never get high-speed rail bed in my observation, recently with the ongoing interstate project through my district, trying to get a highway to indianapolis i see some of the same steppingstones high-speed rail has and some of the discussion needs to revolve around the impediments other than money that are stopping these projects. the reality is there are environmental issues, ongoing lawsuits for years, sometimes decades, right of way egis, ongoing lawsuits, sometimes for decades that cost pe
of these three applications. sports begging banking sports social networking. view editor three we include for free these are all applications you can download for free. what does it has made applications for your computer possiblewindows eighthas made applications for your computer possible. i push this home6 c13 the desktop that feels like windows seven. i can toggle in between those two just with the push of at may be a need to get to window is seven for a minute. you could do you push one more by ted and your back to windows a pre-- and you are back to windows eight. here is the map icon. just came up? i can go to my location. it brought up the tool bar.i can change the map style. to where we are prepared these are you are never going to see in anything but a window is a computer. i know we are extremely busy and there are so many things to show you on windows eight. you have never me present windows eight of the samsung on a---m asa--of and a samsung computer because i have never done it before preadapted. who knows what the price maybe next time. this computer is so powerful i am
-wage employment, being forced to beg for meals, being less likely to have access to transportation and the justice system in whatever country they happen to be in. in america we fought to pass the americans with disabilities act and we lead the world in services in accessibility for disabled people. we passed it because democracy is only as vibrant as it is open to the participation of all citizens. that's why i was proud to cosponsor critical amendments to the a. dea., the americans with ta disabilities act to make the definition of "disability" more inclusive. we taught for the a.d.a. amendments act of 2008 because access to a good-paying job, to public transportation, to public accommodation should be universal. now, some detractors say, well, americans are taken care of here at home. why should we worry about discrimination that disabled people in other countries might suffer? dr. king wrote in a letter from a birmingham jail that injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. he explained that we're caught in an inhescapable network of mutuality tied in a single garment of destiny. wha
has increased which then begs for more investment at different speeds. how is that factored into your analysis about whether there's an efficiency and investing and whether it's the california corridor or another? >> we are still assessing the california's process, the rail authority process for for developing its ridership and revenue forecasts. but our sense is that largely filed their best practices after the impact inspector general has put a really nice guys out there, but, you know, it's inherently risky. your forecasting the future. it's an extreme accomplished undertaking. but that being said it's critical to determine the viability of our project. and i think the key to this is that you have to continually refined the as and as the project scope is being change. you just update the model, make sure that you have the state-of-the-art, if you will, and you just, as the economy changes, so you just constantly updating and refining and seeing if you need to tweak where things need to go. so that's the process that i think california is undertaking as well. >> let me just turn, be
-- and a pair of white boots. charlotte begged and begged to wear her new outfit early and on friday, december 14, the last day of charlotte's young life, her mother joann agreed. or parents like steve and rebecca kowalski, who lost their son chase. two days before the shooting chase was asked what he wanted for christmas and i understand he pointed to his two missing front teeth. any of us who have had the special blessing and joy of raising young children especially at holiday time can only imagine the unbearable sorry of these -- sorrow of these families who now and forever will have a child-sized hole in their hearts and lives. we offer them whatever small measure of comfort we can in knowing that you are not alone, that all across this country and world we pray for your healing and we hope that with time you and your families can come to understand and to live through the grief of this moment. we also think of other parents, parents who raised their young adult children to give back to their community and the next generation by being teachers. in addition to the heroics of the school prin
of any house member who's served in the senate will tell you. gold talks about theñ&buáuáq beg the place where the defense is -- the offense is in the primacy, and in the senate, the defense is in the primacy. house minorities, as i knew for sen -- seven years, get curbed. there's an effect in legislation that it tampers the momentary political passion that are moving through the house, and the more enduring will, the will of the american people, more likely to triumph over the passion. it will make it less efficient, but as we know, that was not the main game of the framers, inefficient government. to the extent the senate becomes a mirror image of the house, which we're seeing with the one man rules committee named harry reid, we'll still have the benefits of the bicameral legislature, but tempered, and the deliberation, especially, is going to be hurt. that's the third point. the liberation is really the proposed power grabby the majority underminds deliberation, that's really intended to improve legislation. the issue's not whether or not harry reid continues his unprecedented effort
veterans like him who stand with locked arms begging us to pass this convention, we owe it to the disabled people across america and around the world to stand up once and again for the rights of the disabled and for expanding opportunity not just in america, but across the world. people say we are an exceptional nation. there's a little bit of aoeg ism in that -- egotism in that statement, but i believe it is -- i ask for 30 additional seconds. but i believe it is factual that america is an exceptional nation twhe steps forward in the -- when it steps forward in the belief that freedom, liberty and opportunity should be for everyone within our country and around the world. today is our chance. let no minor argument over some minor political issue stop us from focusing on the reality that what we are doing is historic not just for america but for the world. we owe it not just to bob dole. we owe it to the disabled veterans and the disabled community to stand up and say to the world join us. join us in expanding the reach of opportunity to those who have been left behind. i yield the floor.
attack. that project, the great project is begging for money. it barely manages to get its basic budget of the year. and this is the sort of thing that i think ought to be supported by the u.s. government in a way that is not. and the final thing we need to do in terms of non-state actors is a al qaeda came the closest to developing wmd when they were in control of the territory in afghanistan which the time and space was to develop wmd to the you have to keep the groups like that. >> talking about the wmd attacks by the non-state actors, chemical, biological, i know in the formal weapons inspector you served on the international task force on the prevention of nuclear terrorism and i wonder if you could talk about the nuclear terrorism. how likely is it? >> again i am a scientist, so i think it is a very small probability to reject the idea 50%. i think it is much less than one but i also say the chance that fukushima happening was less than 1%. it is a low probability and a horrific consequences, and i think as the proliferation happens and the nuclear capabilities, several nuclear ca
side in almost the state of states. that's the real question and that's the question begged for the next 10 years with xi jinping in office. can that continue and grow? or can make it another decade out of the system? >> we really believe at least the administration, part of their success in being able to enact reform and address the growing disparity between haves and have knots between urban and rural people has to be opening up their markets, financial -- reform of the financial services are, less dependence and reliance on state owned or government owned businesses. greater protection for intellectual copyrights for their launch partners. not just american companies, but intellectual property rights of the veteran entrepreneurs because if their inventors and scientists are to create and invent after putting a lot of hard-earned money and time is spent into these discoveries and innovations, they want to make sure their products and and impatience ideas are stolen either. so what we're really pushing for is a level playing field for foreign companies, fair competition, ru
agree with the impetus of your question. >> i think it begs the question of why did that happen. honestly, time is always a factor. clearly, no specific follow-up over time. one of the major recommendations of the building plan, which fell off from 10 embassies a year to three. tied to budget constraints and et cetera. so i think it was a combination of factors. while 1999 is certainly close to this decade, the world has changed radically in this decade. the risks that are associated with that world are, i think -- we are in a much more difficult and challenging position with respect to meeting the needs to be out there and doing so in a way that our people are very specifically secured. >> there is a specific recommendation for a ten-year program. a very significant level of funding, specifically to meet the point that admiral mullen made that are building programs. it needs to go back to the original target. >> ambassador, you are extremely critical of the performances of individuals in the view of diplomatic security. the middle east bureau. this is part of a hierarchy of org
will be recommendations need to be carried out. we very much agree with the impetus of your question. >> begs the question of why did that happen. a lot of the time, that is always a factor and clearly there is no specific follow-up. one of the major recommendations was 10 new embassies year to three tied to budget constraints and etc. i think it was a combination of factors. the world has changed dramatically in this decade. the risks that are associated with that -- i think we are in a much more difficult and challenging position with respect to meeting the needs of their and doing so in a way that our people are very specifically secured. >> picking up on that, there is a very significant level of. specifically the one that will mullen mentioned. it needs to go back to that original target. >> your report, ambassador, was part of a hierarchy of local organizations. the report up the management chain. what is the highest level at the department of state where you take responsibility for what happened at benghazi? >> we think that that assistant secretary level, which is in our view, the appropriate plac
of change. 2013 is coming. we can't have the same issues. it's not supposed to be fair on everyone. so i beg you, let's try something different. [applause] >> how about the female speaker from the northwest? anybody from the northwest? yes. >> whatever we do, i try to think different -- >> your name. >> i am anthony dames friend northwest. whatever we do, trying to pick something different in so many places is difficult, especially when there's more important things to focus on. [applause] >> okay, time is slightly against us. i now need to call in order to conclude the debate from the northeast, mr. matthew wilson. [applause] >> thank you, mr. speaker. transport has become a necessity. we use it to get educators, to get health care and to get employment. in recent years, transport it backwards. crisis have rocketed in the liability has made young people's lives are difficult. today we have heard that cost is the biggest issue for young people. statistics have shown that 16 to 18-year-olds the other transport fares are too high. to put them into context, that is more than double the populati
got a couple minutes left. i beg to that view, he did reporting on this and you talk to john moran and both men have passed away in the last couple years after the case was decided. tell us about lawrence and garner. >> guest: they were both people who grew up with a humble background. not much education. tyrone garner is one of the tents of 10 children in the lack that his family. he never had a permanent home, never owned a car, shifted from house to house. shawn lawrence did have a steady job as a medical technologist, but neither he nor tyrone were ever involved in any kind of civil rights movement for civil rights causes until the case came along. tyrone garner died in 2006 about a year after it interviewed him and john moran said last november in 2011 about six months after my second interview with him, in which he told me that whole story. >> host: unit to set the record straight about what actually happened in the department. he never got to tell his story at the time this case is coming on. i take it he also was proud of the case than what it had accomplished. >> guest: ye
there in the well begging his colleagues to pass this disabilities convention, maybe his last lobbying effort that he would undertake. it meant so much to the dole family and to robert dole. he came to the floor and we called the measure, and those who witnessed it will remember that most members came and sat in their chairs to cast a vote, which is rare here, and it really tells the story that this was more than just an ordinary, routine vote. we listened as the roll call was made, and we watched the senators stand and vote, and then toward the end i turned to tom harkin who was sitting right over here and i said, we don't have it, we missed it. we did. we failed to ratify this by five votes. 61 votes. we needed 66 votes because senator kirk is antibiotic because of illness -- is absent because of illness. 66 votes we needed to pass this. there were only eight republicans that would stand with all of the democrats to pass this convention on disabilities. senator john mccain led that effort, john mccain, a person who knows the cost of war and the price that's paid and who showed real, extraor
. that would be the impact on it. because most of the money, the new money that that he would beg is to fund new spending. so i'm worried about this. i don't think that the leader of our nation, the one person elected by all the people, should be laying out a program to the american people that does not honestly deal with the debt threat that we have that, does not honestly lay out to the american people how we're on an unsustainable course, as every expert has said. it does not honestly talk with the american people about why medicare is in trouble, why social security is in trouble and what we need to do to fix it. our president won't even talk about that. and when somebody talks about it in a serious way to fix those programs, they get attacked by the white house. and this new budget doesn't do anything about it either. i think this is not good leadership, and i hope and i know senator mcconnell and speaker boehner have pleaded with the president to talk about these long-term systemic problems. social security, medicare, medicaid and interest on the debt is almost 60% of what we spend in
a project that's authorized, that has gone to the corps for study -- i beg your pardon? the presiding officer: the senator's time has expired. mrs. feinstein: may i ask for two minutes additional time, please. the presiding officer: is there objection? without objection. mrs. feinstein: thank you very much. would essentially take a corps project that has been authorized and the study is being done. once the study is concluded, t the -- and it is cost-effective, the corps proceeds to construction. with respect to mitigation, what this amendment does is, as i understand it, is remove that authorization. now, i could understand how the language before was overly bro broad. what senator boxer and i did in an earlier amendment was narrow that language and we've addressed the shortcoming of the provision by striking it with an earlier amendment. that's amendment number 3421 and replacing it with new text. so this new text no longer authorizes an undefined set of projects. rather, it directs funding to be utilized to construct projects in areas that suffered direct inundation impacts from hu
-- we're begging the nfl players and college to offer their -- report them. there's no real education program for children. nobody believes we can train children to report the symptom. they don't understand concussion. you separate the two things and you realize that, you know, we are refusing to give children the things we think grown men deserve. and if you look at it from that perspective, the tackle football question especially when you get the youngest ages does seem out of place. that we allow that to happen. and this, this isn't a referendum on u.s.a. football on warner. the leading on this in terms of reforms. and i think that's fabulous but the reality is the big lack of control over can you force youth football programs to do the things we know is a good idea. the answer we just said is no. we can't. with the unknown and issues, we have to take a serious look. >> yeah i want to bring i
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)